The Benefits of Music Therapy

Music Therapy is an extensively researched form of therapy. It is proven to help people with the physical, mental, emotional and social aspects of their lives.

 

As some of you may be aware, a few years ago I qualified as a registered nurse and a registered midwife. Although I gained both of these qualification, the universe guided me in an alternate direction (The WCMS direction!), but there is still a part of me that has a great passion for helping others and an interest in how the human body works on a cellular level and in a more holistic way. 

Over the past couple of days, I wrote about how learning an instrument can benefit the physiological and psychological aspects of a healthy brain. Today I want to continue on this path and look at the benefits of music in unwell people. 

During my RN/RM studies, I stumbled across the term music therapy, but never looked deeply into it. As fate had it, a year after I finished my qualifications, I met Emily Mostratos, one of the few qualified Music Therapists in WA. She inspired me to research Music Therapy, and what I discovered shocked me (in a good way!) I don't claim to be an expert, but the scientifically proven benefits of Music Therapy are too profound to ignore. 

Music Therapy is an extensively researched form of therapy. It is proven to help people with the physical, mental, emotional and social aspects of their lives. Being exposed to music stimulates brain waves, and like any other organ, exercising the brain results in it being stronger, sharper and more useful. Music therapy has been used to aid in the treatment of stress, mental disorders, cancer, speech impediments, high blood pressure and heart problems (just to name a few!). It is considered to be a part of a holistic health approach, but unfortunately due to lack of education in the general public, it is underutilised.  

Music therapy is designed to:

  • improve communication,
  • decrease anxiety and stress
  • alleviate pain and promote physical rehabilitation 
  • aid in the learning of social skills and expression of emotions
  • enhance memory 
  • promote general wellness 

It is clear that music is a very powerful tool. If you feel you or a loved one could benefit from the power of music therapy, reach out to a qualified music therapist. You can find Emily her E.L.M. Music Therapy Facebook page 

 

Kathryn Raats2 Comments